Saturday, October 25, 2014

10-26-2014 -- 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year A

October 26, 2014 - 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year A



Love is the greatest commandment.
But love is not about rules and regulations, ordinances and laws.

Love is a command to do something, the command to do something about our relationships.

A four year-old child had an elderly neighbor had just lost his wife. One day she saw him sitting in his yard crying, so she went over and climbed into his lap and just sat there.

When her mother asked what she was doing she replied, “Nothing, I just helped him cry.”

Love is a command to do something, the command to do something about our relationships.

A young boy sat at a diner and asked the waitress how much was an ice cream sundae. Fifty-cents came the reply.

The pulled the coins out of his pocket and studied them carefully.

How much is a plain ice cream? Thirty-five cents.
I’ll take the plain ice cream.

When the boy finished his ice cream he paid the cashier and left. When the waitress came back to wipe the counter she found fifteen cents placed neatly beside the empty dish.

Love is a command to do something, the command to do something about our relationships.


The command is to love God and neighbor.
Do we follow this command?

We all need assurance that we are loved. We all need to feel the loving touch of another. We all need the warmth of another’s cheek. We all need the comfort of another’s arms embracing us.

Our neighbors come in remarkable varieties.

Ranging from delightful to classy to funny to irritating
to challenging to bothersome to downright enraging.

It’s easy to love a neighbor who picks up the paper and feeds the dog while we’re away.

It’s more difficult to love a neighbor who spreads gossip about us all over town.

It’s most difficult to love a neighbor who blares his boom box at the stop sign outside our window at two o’clock in the morning.

Let us commit ourselves, here and now, to reach out to a neighbor in need.

It could be as simple as visiting a sick or elderly relative; or having a cup of coffee with a friend who hasn’t been to Mass in a while; or doing a good deed for someone without expecting something in return.

Are we willing to love and to be loved? To care and to be cared for? To hold and to be held?

Above all else, we must be people of love. Love must come first.
Love must be the center of our lives.

Love was central for Jesus. It was so central that he gave his very life out of love for us.

We can get everything else just right but if we don’t have love, we don’t have anything at all.

As we approach the Eucharistic table, do we realize that the bread and wine are gifts of love?

These gifts of love come from the one who gave his very life for us, the one who gave us the two greatest commandments:

Love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul and with all your mind and love your neighbor as yourself.

The famous children’s poet Shel Silverstein puts it this way:

Said the little boy, “Sometimes I drop my spoon,”
Said the little old man, “I do that too.”

The little boy whispered, “I wet my pants.”
“I do that too,” laughed the old man.

Said the little boy, “I cry often.”
The old man nodded, “So do I.”

“But worst of all,” said the boy, “It seems
Grown-ups don’t pay attention to me.”

And he felt the warmth of a wrinkled old hand.
“I know what you mean,” said the little old man.

Love is a command to do something, the command to do something about our relationships.


1 comment:

  1. Thank you, Father. This is one of the best/most meaningful sermons that I have heard.

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