Saturday, November 21, 2015

11-22-2015 -- Christ the King, Year B

November 22, 2015 - Christ the King, Year B
Saint Martin de Tours Catholic Church




Our scripture readings on this feast of our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the universe, describe two worlds, two kings, two kingdoms.


Two worlds. One, a world of armies and soldiers, political power, violence, a world of occupation and oppression.


The other, a world of truth, a world of betrayal and a world of redemption. A world where the dead rise again to everlasting life.


Two kings. One, a king who needs armies and attendants fighting for him, a king who has the power to overcome and dominate others. Pilate is the Roman governor. He is the representative of an earthly king, Caesar Augustus, of Rome.


The other, a King who is slain to set his people free from the oppression. A king who turns the other cheek, who says pray for your enemies and give without counting the cost.


Jesus is the King who comes in the clouds with glory and whose dominion is everlasting. Jesus' Kingship shall not be destroyed. He is the King who frees us by being slain, who washes us free from our sins with his own blood.


Two kingdoms. One, a kingdom of the world, a kingdom that is passing, a kingdom where God's chosen ones would be thrown to the lions and nailed to crosses and burned on poles.


The other, a kingdom in the clouds, a kingdom that is coming, a kingdom where the least will be the greatest, a kingdom where the blind will see, the lame will walk and the deaf will hear.

Entrance to Jesus' kingdom is not gained by fighting or by accumulation of wealth or through earthly power.


God's kingdom comes through an incredible act of surrender.


“Father, for you all things are possible, remove this cup from me, yet, not what I want but what you want. Your will be done.”


The Alpha and the Omega, the one who is, who was, and who is to come, came to us to share our lives.


Jesus Christ, the King of the universe, came to us to show us how to live and how to love. He came to serve and to give his life to save us, to redeem us, and to triumph over sin and death.


Do we accept Jesus Christ as Lord and King and believe in his kingdom. How often do we follow our King's example? How often do we serve instead of being served? How often do we give of ourselves for others?


We are so blessed to have a loving compassionate King, not distant, not far off, but very near to us.


Our King comes to be part of our lives, to share our pain and suffering, our joys and our gladness, but our King teaches us to put others first.


Our King teaches us that love always conquers hate. Our King was slain so that life always triumphs over death.

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